6 Best Insoles for Shoes That Are Too Big (2022 Guide)

6 Insoles Featured

After reviewing 15 products, Superfeet Green inserts are the best insoles for shoes that are too big.

We paid our testers to buy and try different insoles. We wrote the buyer’s guide and reviews based on their notes. We also spoke to our team doctors afterwards to make sure we didn’t say anything silly.

We like the Superfeet Greens because of their quality and design. The rigid layer is high-volume and supportive. It really fills a big shoe up. The soft layers have excellent cushioning. The insole also does a good job stabilizing the foot inside the shoe.

Other models stood out for specific shoe types. The Timberland Pros are perfect for boots. The German-made Currex Runpros are our favorites for running shoe models. They even came first in a Cologne University scientific study!

To learn more about these shoe models and our other top picks, keep reading.

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Disclaimer: This guide was created for educational purposes. It neither offers nor replaces medical advice. Learn more here.

Table of Contents

Best Insoles for Shoes That are Too Big

editors pick

100/100

Our Score

editors pick

Superfeet Insole

Superfeet Insole

Why this product?

The flagship Superfeet insole. Supportive, stable and flexible. Can be cut down to match your foot size. Lasts a while. 

100/100

Our Score

This is the flagship Superfeet insole. It’s my top pick for shoes that are too big, and here’s why. It has two layers. The first is a half-sole stabilizer cap. This layer has a deep heel cup and strong sole support. It’s flat and rigid, never sliding around when inside the shoe.

On top of the stabilizer cap is a dense memory foam layer. This foam can be cut down to your shoe size. It moulds to your foot shape over time and is soft and flexible. It’s completely flat in the forefoot, and can easily be cut down to fit any shoe.

This combination of an ergonomic layer and a mostly-flat foam layer is genius. The result is a shoe that’s both soft and supportive, stable and flexible. The heel cup isn’t just secure; it’s sculpted for foot pain relief. 

The insole lasts a long time and can be moved from shoe to shoe. It’s odor-resistant, with an antimicrobial treatment that eliminates bacteria. It’s available in sizes 2.5-17 for men and 4.5-16 for women.

Pros

  • Odor resistant
  • Antimicrobial
  • Memory foam layer
  • Can be cut down

Cons

  • None

Best Insoles for Boots that are Too Big

99/100

Our Score

Timberland PRO Insole

Timberland PRO Insole

Why this product?

Shock absorbent, durable and lightweight. Lasts a while. Has a thin Ortholite layer that reduces rubbing and provides ventilation. 

99/100

Our Score

This Timberland PRO insole is our top choice for boots. It uses unique inverted cone foam. This foam is shock-absorbent, durable and lightweight. It combines air pockets with springy, rubbery foam.

This gives you good shock absorption for walking and standing while keeping the sole light. It also makes the sole flexible so it moves together with your foot.

We’re big fans of the insole’s ergonomic design. The heel and mid-foot sections are narrow. There’s an elevated midfoot area to keep the arch elevated and supported. There’s also a deep heel cup that stops the foot from sliding around. It has excellent heel grip. The forefoot area is wide enough for you to splay your toes out comfortably.

On top of the rubber section is a thin Ortholite layer. This provides ventilation and reduces rubbing. While the Timberland Pro isn’t marketed as a cut-to-size product, it performs best when used that way. The area you need to cut does not feature the inverted cone pattern. It’s very easy to trim down to fill your foot.

We like everything about this product. These aren’t orthotic insoles, though. They will not elevate a flat foot or correct a high arch. If you need that, check out the next model on our list.

Pros

  • Reduces rubbing
  • Lightweight
  • Easy to trim down to size

Cons

  • None

Most Comfortable Insoles for Shoes that Are Too Big

97/100

Our Score

Samurai Insoles

Samurai Insoles

Why this product?

Good orthotic features perfect for heel, foot and arch pain. Bouncy, durable foam. Fit perfectly into most shoes. Last a while. 

97/100

Our Score

The Samurai Insoles are the comfiest, best-cushioned inserts we tested. They combine soft, bouncy foam with good orthotic features. They’re perfect for heel, foot and arch pain. They’re good for boots if you need arch support. We also like the model for walking shoes because it’s so mobile.

This shoe insole has a very clever design. It’s made of thick, shock-absorbing memory foam. Inside this foam is an orthotic half-sole. This means the shoe is bouncy all over, flexible in the forefoot and supportive in the midfoot. It also prevents heel slippage well thanks to the semi-rigid heel cup.

The insert has a slim but high-volume shape. Good if you have a narrow foot or a wide shoe. Unlike all other models we tested, the forefoot and toe sections are slightly elevated. Since most modern shoes have an elevated toe box, we thought this was a nice touch. The Samurai Insoles slid right into the shoe pairs we tested them with.

The downside to this product is its price… But you get what you pay for. Custom orthotic inserts can cost a lot more, and many consumers say they offer more pain relief.

Pros

  • Shock absorbing memory foam
  • Elevated insole
  • Supportive
  • Flexible

Cons

  • Pricey

Best Running Shoe Insoles

96/100

Our Score

Currex Runpro

Currex Runpro

Why this product?

Very flexible. Slip-resistant. Has multiple parts; each one has its own unique features. Uses porous foam to provide cushioning where you need it most. 

96/100

Our Score

This German-made insole came first in University of Cologne study. If you need cushioning and arch support for running, it’s the product to get. The yellow foam layer provides shock absorption. The air pockets in it are bigger around the heel, providing more bounce and cushioning in that area.

The porous structure also makes the sole highly flexible for running. It’s also molded to prevent heel slippage and elevate the arch a little. It’s flat in the front, which is good. Runners’ toes need to splay out, so we don’t want high volume there. Thanks to the extra toe space, this is also one of the best running shoes for wide feet.

The arch area has a tougher Foot Disc attached to the yellow foam. This supports the arch and is different between the Low, High and Medium arch models. It has flex grooves and flex patterns that make it flexible without sacrificing support. We’ve never seen anything quite like it.

The front of the sole features waffle pattern rubber underfoot. This works to keep the sole locked in place. The heel section has a gel-like blue overlay. It’s thin but very bouncy, cushioning the heel. Many runners strike hard with the heel, so this is good.

The sole can be cut down to size, which is important. Runners need a little extra space in the toe box, and we don’t want to fill that up with sole. All in all, we agree with those University of Cologne researchers. Hard to beat this sole for running.

Pros

  • Shock and absorption
  • Good cushioning
  • Extra toe space
  • Can be cut down
  • Flexible

Cons

  • None

Best Soft Orthotic Shoe Insert for Oversized Shoes

97/100

Our Score

PowerStep Original Insoles

PowerStep Original Insoles

Why this product?

The EVA foam layer molds to the shape of your foot over time. Flexible enough for sports. Prevents heel slippage. Designed by podiatrists. 

97/100

Our Score

Want orthotic insoles that don’t have a rigid layer? Then take a look at the original Powerstep model. It’s designed and recommended by podiatrists. It was made to treat and alleviate heel pain, plantar fasciitis, metatarsal pain and other common conditions.

The lower layer is EVA foam. This is flexible enough for most sports but tough and hard wearing. It also molds to the shape of your foot over time, though not as well as memory foam would.

The upper layer is foamy Variable Cushioning Technology. It gives most cushioning in the heel, a little less in the forefoot and relatively little in the toe. Since you don’t want your toes to sink into an insole during toe-off, this is perfect.

We really like the shape of this insole. It has a nice, light massaging effect if you have a flat foot. It elevates fallen arches slowly, without straining them. The heel cup is deep and very stable. The sole is available in over 13 sizes, and each size fits the foot well.

Pros

  • Variable cushioning technology
  • Stable
  • EVA foam
  • Available in 13 sizes 

Cons

  • None

Best Budget Insoles for Shoes That are Too Big

92/100

Our Score

Envelop Gel Insoles

Envelop Gel Insoles

Why this product?

Fills the shoe up with a thick gel heel and midfoot. Rubbery texture prevents slippage. Low profile means it fits most shoes, including dress and sports models.

92/100

Our Score

The Envelop Gel Insole is our top budget choice. It’s widely available and inexpensive. It has decent shock absorption and support. Its rubbery texture means it works for walking shoes. Its low profile means it’ll fit dress shoes too.

The shoes are mostly soft rubber. The heel and forefoot areas use a honeycomb pattern for cushioning. The heel and midfoot also use heavier gel for extra shock absorption. This gel has a lowercase “d” shape, with flex grooves on the long side for flexibility. The rubbery texture means the soles don’t slip inside a shoe.

Thie sole fills a shoe up because of the thick gel sole in the heel and midfoot and a mid-volume upper section. The blue rubber is also fairly thick all the way up to the forefoot. For its price, this is an excellent product.

One word of caution. It took us a couple of tries to cut the model out just right. It doesn’t move well once in the shoe, which makes it hard to figure out where to cut it. You have to apply some effort to get it into position. We ended up measuring it against the outside of the shoe.

Pros

  • Thick gel sole
  • Stable 
  • D shape with flex grooves
  • Flexibility

Cons

  • Difficult to cut to size 

Buying Guide

Shape and size

Your shoes need to be just the right size.

If you get a model that’s too small, it won’t fill up the whole shoe. It might slide around laterally or back to front, causing discomfort and blisters.

If you get a model that’s too big, it’ll bend and crumple inside the shoe. This’ll also cause discomfort, rubbing, etc.

Most insoles can be cut down for length. If you’re not sure which size you need, get those. Be extra careful with width, though. If an insole is too wide for your shoe, you may not be able to trim it down for size.

Arch support

Most shoe models have arch support in the insole and/or midsole. With an oversized shoe pair, you’re usually not getting that support because your foot’s the wrong size.

That’s why we want some arch support from the insole we’re inserting. This will keep the feet energized, prevent arch pain and give us better posture.

Ergonomics and stability

A good insole won’t just take up space inside the shoe. It’ll help the shoe fit better, making an oversized shoe feel good.

For this to happen, we need an insole that’s specifically shaped to contain your foot. A deep heel cup and an elevated mid-foot section are good. Toe ridges are also good – but exceedingly rare.

Cushioning

Your shoe’s original insole will almost universally have some cushioning. To replicate its foot feel, we need the same from our new insole.

For walking and sports, gel insoles are good. For arch support, insoles that combine semi-rigid mid-foot support with a softer heel and forefoot are good.

Materials

Some materials go out quickly. Other materials, like memory foam and cork, get better over time. They to your feet slowly while continuing to support and cushion.

Removable Insoles vs Heel Liner Products

Heel liner (not to be confused with heel inserts) is a strip of fabric. You stick it to the heel section of a shoe. This pushes your foot forward, more towards the toe box.

Our team was not a fan of the heel liner products we tested. Thin heel liners are good to prevent rubbing and scraping. Thick ones, to us,changed shoes’ fit and function.

Specifically, it pushed our heels out of the heel cup and into the midfoot area. This made shoes feel uncomfortable. So while we like heel liners for softness, we don’t like them for making shoes fit.

If you want an alternative, look up the tongue pad products on Amazon. These actually push the foot down into the insole without causing heel slippage. A narrow foot tester on our team uses them on dressy leather shoes to make the upper more comfortable.

FAQ

How do you fix shoes that are too big?

High-volume insoles will make a shoe fit smaller while providing cushioning and arch support. You could also wear thicker socks.

Do Insoles Help if Shoes are Too Big?

Insoles will make an oversized shoe fit better, prevent blisters and improve posture. They can also prevent heel pain and conditions like flat feet.

What are the best insoles for shoes that are too big?

The SuperFeet Green and classic Samurai Insoles green models are widely recommended by podiatrists, testers and consumers.

Is it bad to wear shoes a half size too big?

It depends. Sometimes you can wear thick socks and not notice the difference. In other cases, going half a size up will cause discomfort and pain.

In Closing...

Our top overall pick for shoe filler insoles is the Superfeet Green model. It combines a mid-volume profile with excellent support and cushioning. It’s pricey, but it’s also very durable.

For more cushioning, we like the Samurai Insoles. They were a close contender for the top overall spot. They are very soft and comfortable underfoot.

Last but not least, we have to mention the Timberland Pro insoles. We’re surprised they’re not standard in the brand’s boots, but then they’re pretty high-tech. It’d probably make the footwear a lot more expensive to use them for all boots.

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Writer:

George P.H.

Co-Writer:

Dr. katherine Enes

Last Updated:

April 26, 2022

George P.H.

George is the founder of Shoethority. He started testing and studying shoes after a series of sports injuries. He now shares his knowledge with Shoethority readers as a writer, tester and editor. 

Dr. Katherine Enes

Dr. Enes is a doctor (M.D.) specializing in physical therapy, osteopathy and sports medicine. As a working doctor, she helps patients rehab and improves athletes’ biomechanics.

Dr. Enes is also a sports enthusiast. She’s tried capoeira, Crossfit, Swedish walking and more. Her main sports are general fitness and walking. 

As a writer for Shoethority, Dr. Enes covers biomechanics, injury recovery, injury prevention and more.